Assessment of some risk factors for angiographically defined coronary artery disease in the Erbil Cardiac Center

  • Mariwan H. Saka Department of internal medicine, college of medicine, Hawler Medical University, Erbil, Iraq.
  • Mothafar A. Barzani Department of internal medicine, college of medicine, Hawler Medical University, Erbil, Iraq.
Keywords: Coronary Disease, Risk Factors, Angiography

Abstract

Background and objective: There are many modifiable risk factors that are closely associated with coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to assess the association between some coronary risk factors and the angiographically documented coronary artery disease.

Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was based on review of hospital records of 310 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography in Erbil Cardiac Center. A questionnaire was used to record patient’s demographic profile, coronary risk factors and the severity of stenosis in percentage.

Results: Of the 310 patients, 69.4% had evidence of coronary artery disease on coronary angiography. Male gender, age, diabetes, and smoking habit were strongly associated with angiographically documented coronary artery disease, while the association of hypertension and family history were not statistically significant. Only male gender was strongly associated with severity of coronary artery disease.

Conclusion: The angiographic extent of coronary artery disease was found to have the strongest positive correlation with male gender and the weakest with hypertension. The most important predictive factors for coronary artery disease positivity were age, diabetes and smoking status. Hypertension and family history of premature coronary artery disease did not prove to be either a significant predictor of coronary artery disease at coronary angiography or an important determinant of coronary artery disease severity.

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Published
2018-09-23
How to Cite
Saka, M., & Barzani, M. (2018). Assessment of some risk factors for angiographically defined coronary artery disease in the Erbil Cardiac Center. Zanco Journal of Medical Sciences (Zanco J Med Sci), 19(2), 949 - 956. https://doi.org/10.15218/zjms.2015.0016
Section
Original Articles