Assessment of the knowledge of paraplegic persons regarding self-care activity

  • Sideeq Sadir Ali * Department of Adult Nursing, College of Nursing, Hawler Medical University, Erbil, Iraq.
  • Rawand Musheer Haweizy Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Hawler Medical University, Erbil, Iraq.
  • Saadia Ahmed Khude Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Hawler Medical University, Erbil, Iraq.
Keywords: Paraplegia, Knowledge, Self-care activity

Abstract

Background and objective: Knowledge for getting self-care activity is the one important issue in the quality of life for a paraplegic person to live independently. This study aimed to assess the level of knowledge of persons with complete paraplegia regarding how to do self-care activity during daily living.

Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 58 cases with complete paraplegia out of 202 cases with spinal injuries that were admitted to the Emergency Management Centre in Hawler from 2008 to 2014. Information data on paraplegic persons was collected from August 15th to October 15th, 2014 through the interview by using a questionnaire.

Results: The majority of persons with paraplegia were young (32.8%), male (84.5%), married (58.6%), secondary school graduates (35.3%), unemployed (72.4%), having income exceeding the needs (50%) and live in the urban area (77.6%). Most of them had thoracic injury at level 9 to 12 (70.7%). The most common cause of injury was fall from high (41.4%) and the majority of readmissions were for bedsores (87%). The knowledge of paraplegic persons of self-care activity was at a high level (87.9%). Those living in urban areas had a significantly higher knowledge than those living in rural areas (93.3% vs 69.2%, P = 0.019).

Conclusion: Persons with paraplegia had good knowledge for self-care activity, but still need continuous knowledge and practical training. Urban areas need more help and knowledge.

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Published
2018-08-30
How to Cite
Ali, S., Haweizy, R., & Khude, S. (2018). Assessment of the knowledge of paraplegic persons regarding self-care activity. Zanco Journal of Medical Sciences (Zanco J Med Sci), 20(2), 1294 - 1303. https://doi.org/10.15218/zjms.2016.0023
Section
Original Articles